Biography

Joshua Bevitz is a legal strategy pioneer who develops creative litigation solutions to address the individual needs of each of his clients.  He concentrates his legal practice on real estate, construction, business litigation, and cybersecurity.  As partner in the Walnut Creek office of Newmeyer Dillion, Joshua advises developers, builders, contractors, and other businesses on a variety of real estate, construction, insurance, and cybersecurity related claims.  He has experience litigating cases in both state and federal courts, resolving cases through alternative dispute resolution, and in enforcing judgments. 

Joshua also worked for the U.S. Department of Justice, Criminal Division, Office of International Affairs in Washington D.C. While in law school, Joshua was an Executive Editor of the Hastings Law Journal, which published his law school note, Flawed Foreign Policy: Hypocritical U.S. Attitudes Toward International Criminal Forums, 53 Hastings L.J. 931 (2002). Joshua also earned credits at Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland and Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic and honors in his Moot Court and Appellate Advocacy courses.

Services

Awards & Recognition

  • Rising Star, Super Lawyers, 2015-2016

Professional Affiliations

  • Contra Costa County Bar Association
  • CCCBA Food Drive Committee

Charitable & Civic Involvement

  • Congregation B'nai Tikvah
  • Contra Costa County Bar Association Food Drive Committee

Admissions

  • California, 2002
  • U.S. District Court, Northern District of California
  • U.S. District Court, Central District of California
  • U.S. District Court, Eastern District of California
  • U.S. District Court, Southern District of California
  • U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit

Education

  • University of California, Hastings College of Law  (J.D., 2002)
    • International Law Concentration
  • Washington University  (B.A., 1997)
    • English Literature
    • Minor in Writing
  • Washington University  (B.S., 1997)
    • Business, Law, and Economics Concentration